Badia a Coltibuono

Badia a Coltibuono

Badia a Coltibuono is about one thousand years old but its prehistory takes us back to Estrucan times and beyond. As we know it today, Badia a Coltibuono (which means Abbey of the Good Harvest), dates from the middle of the eleventh century. In 1051 the monks of the Vallombrosan Order, a Tuscan reform of the Benedictines, founded the Abbey and also began planting the first vineyards in the Upper Chianti area. Over the centuries they extended their vast land holdings to include many thousands of acres and developed a flourishing wine production and commerce. In 1810, when Tuscany was under Napoleonic rule, the monks were forced to leave Coltibuono and the monastery was secularized. The estate was first sold by lottery and then in 1846, Coltibuono was bought by Guido Giuntini, a Florentine banker and great grandfather of Piero Stucchi-Prinetti, the present owner. Under the guidance of Piero Stucchi Prinetti, the estate grew and built a solid reputation in Italy and abroad through the high quality of its products. Emanuela, Roberto and Paolo, the new generation , continues today the activities embarked upon by their ancestors. For around a century and a half the name and history of the Stucchi Prinetti family has been linked with Badia a Coltibuono. It was in fact in 1846 that one of the family’s forbearers, the Florentine banker Guido Giuntini, acquired the beautiful Romanesque structure and the surrounding farms. Thanks to his complete dedication the entire property began to flourish and survived the second world war virtually intact. After the war, Piero Stucchi Prinetti, the son of Maria Luisa Stucchi Giuntini, took charge of the property. It was thanks to his intelligence, energy and managerial skills that Coltibuono was transformed into a modern estate. He began to bottle and sell the best vintages of the estate’s Chianti Classico, both on the domestic and international markets. Until then, these wines had been laid down in the ancient cellars of the Abbey as the family’s private reserves. Again, he was the first to realise the potential of another traditional product of the region, its extra virgin olive oil. Piero Stucchi Prinetti passed away in 2002. Over the years his children became involved in the running of the estate. Emanuela Stucchi Prinetti began working at Coltibuono in the early eighties taking care of public relations and marketing. She also assisted her mother, Lorenza de’ Medici, in the running of cooking courses and wrote a number of cookery books that have been translated into many languages. In July, 2000, Emanuela was the first woman to be elected as President of the Marchio Storico del Chianti Classico. Today, she manages Coltibuono assisted by her three brothers.

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